Sep 24, 2010

EVERYBODY’S FINE: REVIEW


What will you expect from a movie with as big a star cast as ‘Everybody’s Fine’?

My first reaction when I came to know about it was that it is a must watch; for Robert De Niro’s class, Drew Barrymore’s sweetest acts, Kate Beckinsale’s stunning beauty, Sam Rockwell’s amazing performances and Kirk Jones’s splendid direction.

But after watching the movie (thrice in a day), I need to convey that ‘Everybody’s Fine’ is more than all of these. To be specific, it is more than just a seven plus rated movies. It is a phenomenon which takes over you, which forces you to think more than usual and which tries to carry out some changes if not many in all of us; despite of you being a father or children.

Since the day I started taking decisions on my own, there was a usual tendency in me of ignoring my father in all the plans and developments in my life as I was never so close to him but always included my mother in everything important and necessary. She has been the source of communication between my father and me.

The story of my life is not very peculiar, as I feel, at least some of you reading this review or watching the movie sitting alone or with your friends might be recollecting the same observations of your life too.

‘Everybody’s Fine’ is nothing but the tale of the lot I belong to or probably you belong to.

Robert De Niro plays Frank, the widower who after losing his wife realizes that she was the only connection between him and his kids. Obeying to his intuitions of knowing the wellness of his children; David, Amy (Kate), Rosie (Drew) and Robert (Sam), and ignoring his poorly shaped lungs, the old man starts his expedition to trace the wellness of his kids.

The whole movement that Frank carries visiting places where his children were placed made him realize that all of them were hiding something or the other from him and all his meetings ended with the same question ‘Are you happy?’.

‘Everybody’s Fine’ gives us an insight of a father who felt lost because of his children creating a barrier of ‘I am fine’ with him and it is also shows us the feelings of deep regret that all of his children were facing because they did not want to ‘hurt’ their father by making him realize the true situations they were in. Above all it is also the realization that all of them had at the last when the father accepted his children to be grown up enough, to face their life and the children understood the importance of being true to their father about all their things.

All the actors undoubtedly were remarkable but everyone had a special moment on the screen.

Kate was the finest with the emotions of her surprise while seeing Frank (Robert De Niro) in her house.

Sam’s expressions were the best during one of the last scenes when he is seen placing a candle in front of his brother’s picture.

Drew was lovable throughout her role, the best being the talk with Frank on the dinner table.

And finally Robert De Niro; as I mentioned, the movie is more than a work of cinema and De Niro is more than just an actor in the movie. You can end up confusing his name with ‘Frank’, the role he played after your watch. No scenes can be specified as the best as every time you find his presence on the screen, he is always the best.

After four years of a huge success gained by the famous comedy ‘Nanny Mcphee’, Kirk Jones writes and directs ‘Everybody’s Fine’. If you enjoyed his first two directorial ventures; ‘Waking Ned Devine’ and ‘Nanny Mcphee’, you are going to fall in love with this one. There is something special about this man, and that is not a hand on direction or writing, it is the hand on emotions and handling. None of the scenes are exaggerated and complicated, there is a swift flow throughout the movie and this can only be achieved by someone who can feel rather than surreal.

EVERYBODY’S FINE has everything superb and fantastic.

A must watch for everyone, as there is a story which relates to all.

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